Tag Archives: T. S. Eliot

THE BURDEN OF POETISING (Part 2)

Perhaps, asking the question “Where do unexplored and unexploited talents go?” is like wondering where the fire goes once the candle is put out. Yet, what happens when artists renege on their duties? Does the Muse take back her abilities and pour them on a more co-operative medium, or do the abilities follow the artist to the grave? In order words, would the world still have had the Sonnets, Divine Comedy or the Iliad whether or not there were some Shakespeare, a Dante or a Homer? Continue reading

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LOSS, GRIEF AND IDENTITY CRISES IN IKEOGU OKE’S SALUTES WITHOUT GUNS.

Salutes Without Guns is that kind of strong drink you administer to the grief-stricken until their senses are numbed and they remember their sorrows no more. The reader is exposed to a special type of grief which “no voice can speak”; which “cuts deeper than the quick,/And drips pain even after the end.” The first of the five segments into which the book is broken, drenches even the most hard-hearted reader in gloom. Not a few would pause and wonder why the poet chooses to first satiate the reader with this gourd of vinegar before bringing out the keg of sweet palmwine. Some would have preferred the elegies to come last or at some point within the pleasant session. Continue reading

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