THE BURDEN OF POETISING (Part 1)

Can we agree that there exists this realm of creativity into which the artist’s mind must soar or descend before they can create? Can we also agree that this realm is a ‘restricted area’, accessed only by those minds that have found ways to locate the access ports, which might be what the music composer, Yanni, means by ‘the keys to the imagination’? Is it impossible to imagine poets as miners of imageries who have to erect derricks over the hard shell that incases the realm of creativity? Is it not reasonable to believe that the poet’s first attempts will either drill too deep, to reach the dregs, or go too shallow, to suck up the watery parts? If so, would it then not be unfair or premature to judge poets based on their not-so-impressive debut works since only through constant practice and perseverance can one master the art of projecting the shaft to the proper degree? Continue reading “THE BURDEN OF POETISING (Part 1)”

The Burden of Poetizing: Review of Paul Liam’s Indefinite Cravings

 

 

 

Says Benjamin Whorf, the famous linguistic anthropologist: ‘Language is not merely a reproducing instrument for voicing ideas rather is itself the shaper of ideas, the program and guide for the individual’s mental activity.’
Having the ability to think, imagine and reason without the means to represent them in sounds and/or in symbols reduces a person to a eunuch who can only fantasize sleeping with the princess under his care. Perhaps it is the horror of imagining a world devoid of the means of communication that makes a lot of persons to classify language as the greatest of human inventions. Continue reading “The Burden of Poetizing: Review of Paul Liam’s Indefinite Cravings”