Tag Archives: Book Review

ARTS AS A TOOL FOR SOCIAL CHANGE: REVIEW OF DUMEBI EZAR EHIGIATOR’S WRECKED

Narrated by a somewhat intrusive omniscient, WRECKED is proof of how fluid life can be; how dynamic human nature is and what very little effort it takes to make the world a better place. Like the major character in the book, the author has no doubt contributed her own quota to re-making the world by equipping specifically the girl-child with such a book of case studies as WRECKED. Continue reading

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DANTALA, THE CAT WITH NINE LIVES: A Review of Elnathan John’s Born on a Tuesday

Title: Born on a Tuesday Author: Elnathan John Publisher: Cassava Republic Number of pages: 261 Year of publication: 2015 Category: Fiction The problem with such books as Elnathan John’s Born on a Tuesday is that they set higher standards for … Continue reading

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WHEN THE GODS ARE SLOW TO ACT: A Review of Friday John Abba’s Alekwu Night Dance

Title: Alekwu Night Dance Author: Friday John Abba Publisher: Write Words Consulting Number of pages: 115 Year of publication: 2013 Category: Play A member of Council, a supposed pillar in the land, is driven by nothing short of envy and … Continue reading

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In Defence of Simplicity: Review of Tolu’ Akinyemi’s I Laugh at These Skinny Girls

At first blush, the title of this book would suggest body-shaming, a particular kind of body-shaming targeted at ‘skinny girls’ who are possibly influenced by the glamourization of ultra-thin models in the entertainment industry; ‘skinny girls’ who have possibly been … Continue reading

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DEATH IN VARYING FORMS: A REVIEW OF OLUBUNMI FAMILONI’S SMITHEREENS OF DEATH

To the boy in Flies to Wanton Boys, identity is defined by nationality (an ascribed status) rather than by profession (an achieved status). And it is rightly so. After all, in a war, it matters very little if one is a merchant or a photographer. What seems to matter more is whether one is a soldier or a civilian, a hostile or a friendly, a casualty or a survivor. Continue reading

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A PIERCED HEART: Tunji Olalere‘s Poetry Chapbook (VELVET- BLUE & OTHER UNCERTAINTIES)

I am afraid that the opening poem, Senghor’s Woman, risks being termed misogynistic in some quarters. And it would be such a shame for such a beautiful piece to come under such abused and ambiguous term as misogyny. On the 27th of December 2015, Ikeogu Oke came under no small fire on facebook for posting a poem containing a line that reads: “The bells of your bosom ring me to silent awe.” His critics hold it misogynistic to liken a lady’s breasts to a ‘metallic’ bell. Continue reading

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A Review of Nwachukwu Egbunike’s BLAZING MOON.

Perhaps it is necessary to make it clear that the persona in Blazing Moon is not a total sadist who is only bent on shaming and ridiculing others. As a matter of fact, it might be more accurate to speak of “personas” rather than a “persona” since the voice in Blazing Moon switches between that of a male and a female’s and between the first person and second person. These personas are also interested in the environment, the society, geopolitics, ethics and religion.
Blazing Moon looks like a mural with motifs drawn from the ordinary to the extraordinary; from the natural to the supernatural. With hardly any room for frivolity, the world it intends to depict is so orderly it seems dangerous. And that, for me, is a cause for concern. Continue reading

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FAITH vs. FATE: A REVIEW OF SU’EDDIE VERSHIMA AGEMA’S THE BOTTOM OF ANOTHER TALE

Humans have rebelled against God and laws. Humans have always wanted to be master of both their lives and universe. Adam and Eve ate the fruit they were forbidden to touch. Drunken with success, Odyssey declared his autonomy from Posidon the god of the sea who reminds him that “man is nothing without the gods.” Continue reading

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A REVIEW OF TADE IPADEOLA’S THE SAHARA TESTAMENT

Tade Ipadeola has proven to be one of the last flag bearers of the old guard who still insist on keeping poetry as an art/for only the strong-hearted. Those are the very few who knows what it is to wait upon the Muse to drop on their souls words that merge into phrases and grow into lines and stanzas until they read like chants by the oracles of Delphi. With The Sahara Testaments (and works like it),Tade Ipadeola (and others like him) has in no small way renewed the faith of many who had contemplated giving up on poetry since after the band of cavaliers broke through the gates and hijacked the stage. Continue reading

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