Tag Archives: Arts

WAR AGAINST MECHANISED KITCHENWARE

But whereas the French workers (and their English colleagues who were nicknamed “Luddites”) knew their enemy and tried in their own ways to fight it, it is yet to dawn on today’s man that he ought to devote his very life to resisting radicalised kitchenware which has drastically rendered him dispensable. Continue reading

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THE BURDEN OF POETISING (Part 2)

Perhaps, asking the question “Where do unexplored and unexploited talents go?” is like wondering where the fire goes once the candle is put out. Yet, what happens when artists renege on their duties? Does the Muse take back her abilities and pour them on a more co-operative medium, or do the abilities follow the artist to the grave? In order words, would the world still have had the Sonnets, Divine Comedy or the Iliad whether or not there were some Shakespeare, a Dante or a Homer? Continue reading

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ARTS AS A TOOL FOR SOCIAL CHANGE: REVIEW OF DUMEBI EZAR EHIGIATOR’S WRECKED

Narrated by a somewhat intrusive omniscient, WRECKED is proof of how fluid life can be; how dynamic human nature is and what very little effort it takes to make the world a better place. Like the major character in the book, the author has no doubt contributed her own quota to re-making the world by equipping specifically the girl-child with such a book of case studies as WRECKED. Continue reading

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A REVIEW OF TADE IPADEOLA’S THE SAHARA TESTAMENT

Tade Ipadeola has proven to be one of the last flag bearers of the old guard who still insist on keeping poetry as an art/for only the strong-hearted. Those are the very few who knows what it is to wait upon the Muse to drop on their souls words that merge into phrases and grow into lines and stanzas until they read like chants by the oracles of Delphi. With The Sahara Testaments (and works like it),Tade Ipadeola (and others like him) has in no small way renewed the faith of many who had contemplated giving up on poetry since after the band of cavaliers broke through the gates and hijacked the stage. Continue reading

Posted in Book Review/Criticism: Poetry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments