Monthly Archives: February 2016

A PIERCED HEART: Tunji Olalere‘s Poetry Chapbook (VELVET- BLUE & OTHER UNCERTAINTIES)

I am afraid that the opening poem, Senghor’s Woman, risks being termed misogynistic in some quarters. And it would be such a shame for such a beautiful piece to come under such abused and ambiguous term as misogyny. On the 27th of December 2015, Ikeogu Oke came under no small fire on facebook for posting a poem containing a line that reads: “The bells of your bosom ring me to silent awe.” His critics hold it misogynistic to liken a lady’s breasts to a ‘metallic’ bell. Continue reading

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Is there a connection between contemporary Caribbean and African literature?

Originally posted on Writivism:
By Alexis Teyie In October last year, Marlon James won the Man Booker Prize for his novel, A Brief History of Seven Killings. He is the first Jamaican-born author to win “Britain’s most prestigious literary award.”…

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50 Surprisingly simple ways to promote your book + more from Author Unlimited

Originally posted on Trish Hopkinson:
Author Unlimited is a writing resource site that recently gathered book promotional ideas from its author community for the following article. This site is loaded with great articles for writers and the writing life, including…

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LOSS, GRIEF AND IDENTITY CRISES IN IKEOGU OKE’S SALUTES WITHOUT GUNS.

Salutes Without Guns is that kind of strong drink you administer to the grief-stricken until their senses are numbed and they remember their sorrows no more. The reader is exposed to a special type of grief which “no voice can speak”; which “cuts deeper than the quick,/And drips pain even after the end.” The first of the five segments into which the book is broken, drenches even the most hard-hearted reader in gloom. Not a few would pause and wonder why the poet chooses to first satiate the reader with this gourd of vinegar before bringing out the keg of sweet palmwine. Some would have preferred the elegies to come last or at some point within the pleasant session. Continue reading

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